Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh statement on Rob Rogers

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The members of the Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh were saddened today to learn from a tweet by Rob Rogers that he had been fired as the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette editorial cartoonist. There is much we still do not know. Given the recent killing of a number of Rob’s cartoons critical of President Trump and conservative positions, favorites of the publisher and the editorial director, it perhaps is not surprising that this sad day for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the Pittsburgh community and journalism has arrived.

A Pulitzer Prize finalist and recipient of numerous national awards, Rob worked with verve and aplomb at both the Pittsburgh Press and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. He is a true talent we were honored to know as a colleague and friend. He deserved much better treatment. It appears Rob’s only transgression was doing his job—providing satirical comment based on his political views of the world. There never was a problem before but with the new order of the Post-Gazette editorial pages, it seems that those who do not follow the pro-Trump, pro-conservative orthodoxy of the publisher and editorial director are of no use.

The public should be assured that PG newsroom employees–150 reporters, photographers, copy editors, artists and others represented by the Guild–will continue to produce award-winning, unbiased journalism. Democracy depends upon it. As we do so, we mourn the fact that the PG editorial pages apparently are no longer the free marketplace of ideas.

2018 Guild Scholarship Luncheon

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From left to right: Josh Croup, scholarship winner; Allison Schubert, guest; Tim Grant, PG staff writer; Janine Faust, guest; Ed Blazina, PG staff writer; Amanda Reed, scholarship winner; Nicole Pampena, scholarship winner; Daniel Moore, PG staff writer; Dan Gigler, PG staff writer; Alyssa Brown, PG copy editor/paginator; and Courtney Linder, PG staff writer.

Since 1996, the Guild has awarded more than $64,000 to 46 college students who plan to pursue careers in journalism who either live in the Pittsburgh area or attend a college or university within the coverage area of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

The money can be used to pay tuition, purchase books and electronics or to help defray the expense of participating in an unpaid internship.

This year, the Guild awarded three $1,000 scholarships to:

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From left to right: Scholarship winners Josh Croup, Nicole Pampena and Amanda Reed.

-Amanda Reed, a senior at the University of Pittsburgh studying nonfiction writing and communications, who hopes to work for a magazine one day

-Nicole Pampena, a junior studying journalism at Point Park University with an affinity for broadcast

-Josh Croup, a senior broadcast reporting major at Point Park University who hopes to work as a local news or sports reporter

In early April, Guild leadership and members of the scholarship committee attended a luncheon with the winners at The Foundry on the North Shore to celebrate.

The funding for each scholarship is raised through “Off the Record” a satirical production of the Newspaper Guild, the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Radio and Television Artists.  In addition to supporting the scholarship, the primary beneficiary of this effort is the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.

The winners are chosen by a volunteer committee of Guild members who score entries based on academic achievement, quality of journalism in the writing samples submitted, letters of recommendation and a personal essay.

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From left to right: Allison Schubert, guest; Josh Croup, scholarship recipient; Nicole Pampena, scholarship recipient; Amanda Reed, scholarship recipient; and Janine Faust, guest.

Judges this year were Post-Gazette staff writers Courtney Linder, Daniel Moore and Tim Grant.

The scholarship is named for Sally Kalson, a late colleague, friend and Guild leader who sadly passed away.

A reporter for the Post-Gazette for more than 30 years, Sally was an award-winning Post-Gazette columnist and a longtime Guild officer and negotiator who wrote for the PG and worked for the Guild the way she lived life — with grace, humility, and a commitment to social and economic justice, civil rights, women’s rights, and human rights. 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Will Appeal NLRB Regional Director’s Finding it Violated Federal Law

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This morning, Michael A. Fuoco, president of the Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh, and Jonathan D. Silver, Unit Chairman, were apprised by Richard Lowe, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s attorney from the union-busting Nashville, Tenn., law firm King & Ballow, that the PG will appeal the NLRB regional director’s finding this week that found in favor of the Guild’s Unfair Labor Practice [ULP] filing. The regional director found that the company violated federal law by unilaterally deciding not to pay an increase in health care. Companies involved in bargaining are required by federal law to maintain the same level of wages and benefits of expired contracts. The PG’s refusal to pay the 5 percent increase will decrease health-care benefits for 150 Guild members and another 250 members of other PG unions as of April 1.

It should be noted that Lowe’s advice to appeal the finding to an administrative law judge—he gleefully said he’s willing to appeal all the way to the NLRB in Washington, D.C.–has no downside for him. In fact, it serves to continue to line his pockets and fleece Block Communications Inc., the PG’s parent company based in Toledo, Ohio. Lowe is also negotiating with the Guild local at The (Toledo) Blade, another holding of BCI, owned by the Block family, which includes BCI chairman Allan Block and his twin John Robinson Block, publisher and editor-in-chief of the Post-Gazette and The Blade.

The decision is the latest by BCI that denies its workers economic justice. The Guild and other unions at the PG have been involved in contract negotiations with the paper for more than a year. The Guild’s contract, and those of other unions at the paper, expired March 31, 2017.

Because of extensive wage cuts over the last dozen years, Guild members are earning 10 percent less than they did in 2006, the last time there was a raise. Also during that time, pensions have been frozen, benefits have been cut, health-care coverage has decreased. Yet the cost of everything — including the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette itself — has increased dramatically.

The Post-Gazette and The Blade, like most newspapers in the country, lose money but BCI itself regularly earns more than $100 million in profits annually from its cable, TV and other holdings. Still, over the last year, in some of the most contentious contract talks at the paper in history, the company is demanding even more givebacks.

“BCI’s decision to appeal the regional director’s finding is not surprising given its decision to violate federal law in the first place,” Fuoco said. “This only serves to strengthen our resolve to battle BCI’s greed and its declaration of war on prize-winning, dedicated, talented journalists.”

Fuoco said BCI’s decision to appeal will have consequences but he declined to be specific. In late January, all Guild members withheld their bylines from their stories, photographs, columns and graphics for four days in protest of the ULP, the lack of progress in negotiations and the wage, benefit and staff cuts over the last 12 years.

“We have drawn a line in the sand in these contract negotiations. This paper cannot function without its reporters, photographers, graphic artists, web editors, page designers, copy editors and other Guild members.

“It’s time BCI realizes we are not backing down and there will be no concessionary contract this time. We will fight with everything we have against BCI whose actions devalue our talent and professionalism.

“We will prevail in this battle for economic justice. We are in the right. And right is might.”

-Michael A. Fuoco
President, Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Violated Federal Labor Law, NLRB Regional Director Determines

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PITTSBURGH — The regional director of the National Labor Relations Board has determined that the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette violated federal law by refusing to pay a 2018 increase in the health care costs of 150 members of the Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh while the two parties are involved in contract negotiations. Approximately another 250 unionized employees at the PG are similarly affected.

The Guild filed an Unfair Labor Practice charge against the company on Jan. 12 because, through its union-busting law firm King & Ballow of Nashville, Tenn., it refused to pay a 5 percent increase in the health care premium for 2018, thereby unilaterally cutting health care benefits. Companies involved in bargaining are required by federal law to maintain the same level of wages and benefits of expired contracts. It is believed to be the first ULP the Guild has ever filed against the PG.

“Knowing this law firm and its history in labor relations, their actions aren’t surprising,” said Joseph J. Pass, the Guild’s attorney. “We’re thankful the regional director is willing to issue a complaint as a result of the unfair labor practice.”

The company can either comply with the regional director’s findings or can continue to pay outlandish fees to its Tennessee lawyers by requesting a hearing before an administrative law judge.

The Guild and other unions at the PG have been involved in contract negotiations with the paper for more than a year. Its contract, and those of other unions at the paper, expired March 31, 2017.

Because of extensive wage cuts, Guild members are earning 10 percent less than they did in 2006, the last time there was a raise. Also during that time, pensions have been frozen, benefits have been cut, health-care coverage has decreased. Yet the cost of everything — including the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette itself — has increased dramatically.

The Post-Gazette, like most newspapers in the country, loses money but its highly profitable parent company, the family-owned Block Communications Inc. of Toledo, Ohio, is able to write off those losses and regularly earns more than $100 million in profits annually. Still, over the last year, in some of the most contentious contract talks at the paper in history, the company is demanding even more givebacks.

“Our hope is that the NLRB’s decision is a wakeup call to BCI that it should stop listening to King & Ballow and cease wasting money trying to defend its violation of federal law,” said Michael A. Fuoco, a PG veteran reporter and Guild president. “It is time for BCI to negotiate fairly and equitably with the Guild and all unions and to quit wasting money on a law firm that apparently is not interested in negotiating in a substantive way but only in lining its coffers.”

In late January, all Guild members withheld their bylines from their stories, photographs, columns and graphics for four days in protest of the ULP and the more than 12 years of pay cuts and other concessions demanded by BCI. Those who work behind the scenes–copy editors, page designers, web editors and others –wore stickers reading “I Support the Byline Strike.” Participation among the 150 members was 100 percent.

Additional Guild actions are possible should BCI refuse to remedy its current unfair labor practice and to bargain in a fair and equitable manner.

Michael A. Fuoco,
President, Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh

An update on negotiations

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We are still seeking an equitable contract with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette but it’s difficult when only one side is trying to negotiate. We met yesterday and made no progress.

In fact, in the 11+ months since our contract expired, the only proposals from the company have been concessionary — this despite the fact we made 10 percent more in 2006 and had twice the staff then AND BCI makes over $100 million profit each year.

We thank you all for your continued support and will keep you posted as more information becomes available.

-Michael A. Fuoco, President, Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh