Demand that the DOJ return all records to AP

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Posted on newsguild.org in response to the U.S. Justice Department’s seizure of Associated Press phone records:

The Newspaper Guild-CWA and its local that represents AP staffers, The News Media Guild, demands that the U.S. Justice Department return all telephone records that it obtained from phones — including some home and cell phones – of Associated Press reporters and editors.

The collection of these records is egregious and a direct attack on journalists, and the Justice Department needs to cease and desist such investigations. The ability of journalists to develop and protect sources is vital to keeping the public informed about issues affecting their lives.

There could be no justification or explanation for this broad, over-reaching investigation.

Read the full post at the Newspaper Guild’s website.

Guild calls on Tribune sellers to protect papers’ integrity

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tribunesale
Posted on NewsGuild.org:

Recently you’ve seen many petitions asking that the Koch brothers not be allowed to buy the Tribune Company’s newspapers. We understand why the Kochs breed this distrust. They are active political proponents of harsh right-wing positions. We’re also not certain that Tribune will listen to anything but money when the final decision is made.

What we do know is that great papers publish credible, trusted journalism online and on the printed page. Whoever comes to own these mastheads needs to understand that protecting newsrooms from ideological taint is no small thing. The future of American journalism depends on the ability to print truth, not opinion.

We call on Tribune to make a pledge that they’ll only sell to a buyer that will protect the objectivity of the news product by making a public commitment to doing so. The Newspaper Guild-CWA and the Communications Workers of America seek your support in this goal.

On social media and the workplace.

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An interesting, and important, article (“Even if It Enrages Your Boss, Social Net Speech Is Protected”) from today’s New York Times:

Employers often seek to discourage comments that paint them in a negative light. Don’t discuss company matters publicly, a typical social media policy will say, and don’t disparage managers, co-workers or the company itself. Violations can be a firing offense.

But in a series of recent rulings and advisories, labor regulators have declared many such blanket restrictions illegal. The National Labor Relations Board says workers have a right to discuss work conditions freely and without fear of retribution, whether the discussion takes place at the office or on Facebook.

The article goes on to mention the case of a police reporter at The Arizona Daily Star who was fired for what the N.L.R.B. says were “offensive” tweets, such as one that read: “‘What?!?!?! No overnight homicide. … You’re slacking, Tucson.'”

What are your thoughts on social media and the workplace?